February #sewmystyle : Estelle Ponte Jacket


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For this month in the Sew my style challenge we had the option of sewing the Rumana coat or the Estelle Ponte Jacket. Since I am in the North East and I hate winter and being cold, I have jackets that cover winter temperatures starting in the negatives. The Rumana coat is gorgeous, but I didn’t think I had the need for it so I went with the Estelle Ponte Jacket by Stylearc. I can almost wear it all year round and I have not used ponte yet in my sewing. 

Stylearc’s patterns are not tiled with multiple sizes so you have to select one size based on their measurement chart. In purchasing the pdf version of the pattern they give you the size above and below the size you purchased. Based on my shoulder measurement, I thought the size 10 would be best for me. Once seeing the pattern, I printed the size 8. I probably could have used the size 6.

Not knowing a whole lot about ponte I did a little research on the material. It is available in different weights and I wanted it on the heavier side. I was not impressed with Joann Fabrics selection, everything was rather light weight.  So I purchased the ponte fabric in wine from Fabric Wholesale Direct. I have never purchased from them before and I have mixed feelings about them. There is not a ton of selection and a lot of what they show is sold out. They did ship super fast and I had my order in days. I have a few commissions that I am working on and also ordered what they labeled as charmeuse for a dress. It was pretty disappointing. A better name for it should be a costume satin in an acetate. So you can’t be certain what you are going to get. Also my cut of Ponte was off by 4 inches. If I had not needed to shorten the sleeves, this would have caused the pattern pieces to not fit. I have not checked my other fabric yet for accuracy. But I am happy with the weight of the ponte and believe their description to be accurate for it.

Ok back to the pattern! Like I said, I did have to shorten the sleeves. There are no indicators on where to shorten the patterns pieces. So I decided to shorten the sleeves in the forearm area because I need the most fullness around my bicep. I folded the pattern up across the forearm and the I folded in the sides to create a straight line from the wrist to arm pit. 

I physically tried on the paper pattern piece on my arm to make sure I got it right. I should have shortened the body of the jacket as well but I could not visualize how the collar sat or how the cowl came together in paper form. The points of the cowl hit me below the knee and the back is well below my butt. I could have easily taken off at least two inches. The inches could just come off the bottom but I didn’t want to cut it with scissors and lose my nice clean edge on the bottom and a little oversized is ok with me. I am thinking how wonderful this jacket would be in a movie theater or airplane.

The pattern directions are definitely lacking and I would not advise this pattern line for newbie sewists. The directions were a large diagram with many steps mixed on it. There were some numbered steps below it. In the end, I ditched their directions and decided to put it together as I saw fit. I debated on whether to do the flat felled seam or use the overlocker. In the end I decided to do the flat felled seam for some practice, but I didn’t do them 100% correct to eliminate some bulk. To review quickly what a flat felled seam is, you sew your seam with the wrong side together so your seam allowance is on the right side. You then trim down one seam allowance. You fold the remaining seam allowance in half,tucking in the raw edge, fold it over the trimmed seam allowance, and stitch down. In an effort to reduce some bulk, I kinda flat felled the seam. Yes, I said kinda. First, I kept the seam allowance to the wrong side. 

(excuse my ugly ironing board cover please) I still trimmed one of the seam allowance down 

and folded over the remaining seam allowance over the other. 

I did not fold the raw edge under. (That is the center back seam of the collar) The Ponte should not fray, so why add unnecessary bulk. On the outside you see the original seam and the stitching keeping the seam allowance down. I did this for the back seam,at the shoulders, and around the neck.

I put the sleeves in flat instead of in the round.

 At this point I tried on the jacket to check pocket placement. I ended up moving the pockets up about two inches. After attaching the pocket bag pieces to the front and back I sewed the arms together, down the sides, around the pocket bags and to the bottom of the jacket. In turning everything right side out, I am not sure how I like the pockets in the end.

 I considered top stitching around the pocket openings, but with a good pressing they improved enough that I could ignore them. It also bothers me that the edges are unfinished on this garment. It doesn’t need finished because the material is stable but it seems unfinished in my opinion. Perhaps with a lighter Ponte the front could have a facing or lining finishing the seams. I suppose they could also be bound as well. 

My finished Estelle! 

I did like working with ponte and have added some patterned ponte to my fabric wishlist. I recently saw a skirt pattern that works well with ponte that I am debating over. ( Will I wear skirts more???) I am also considering making this jacket again but short and without pockets. 

Anybody else finish their Estelle differently?


Me made holidays : Christmas 2017


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Yes, I know it is mid-February. But I honestly still have gifts sitting in my dining room for friends or their children. This winter we have been hit with freezing temperatures, bad driving conditons, and two different nasty bugs that have been going around. Most of my friends’ children have suffered from these bugs starting in December and the whole family ended up down for the count and socially quarentined. This just means I have been celebrating the holidays for almost three months and I am perfectly fine with that. The bulk of the gift giving has been completed and I now feel ok sharing my me made holiday gifts. I would say that 90% of my gift giving this time around was all me made which I am super proud of. Here is a run down of some of the sewing things I made.

I used this pattern last year to make some kiddo pj pants and I pulled it out again this year.  The little ones who did not get pjs made for them last year got pjs this year.


I made the sleeveless version for a few tiny humans who live in better climates where they could wear this from fall to spring. They are fleece outer layers with flannel backed satin linings. I was disappointed on the selection of toggles and elastic cord locally for this pattern. In searching online, the colors that would best match my projects were from over seas and man they took a long time to get here. I’m talking MONTHS! Plural!

I also had to order the flannel backed satin online. Joann Fabrics carries about 5 colors in store, but many more online. I have purchased this material in black in store before and was quite happy with its weight and sewing performance. This lilac color was not as thick or had the same flannel content on the back. I questioned it immediately as soon as I unpackaged it and dug out my black scraps to compare. Not only was it different to my scraps, it was different compared to the in-store bolts. I imagine the extra colors sold online are from a different manufacturer or maybe my order came off a bad bolt. I am not willing to reorder it to confirm my suspicion. But I will think twice about using the extra colors in the future. There are not a lot of options with this type of lining material I have found. Does anyone have any other suggestions for something similar?

Unicorn headbands/ear muffs

This project is a great fleece scrap buster and a satisfying project to Netflix binge while hand sewing and stuffing. They were warmly received from my My Little Pony enthusiasts.

Furry Friends bows, ties, and bandanas:

Some four legged friends are included in family photos so they have to match to! I made a few bow ties, neck ties and bandanas for some friends this season. Silly me did not think to take photos of all of them before they went off to snazzy up some already handsome pups for the holidays.

Collared shirts

I used Blank Slate Pattern for the Bookworm Button up to make this. I think I am mastering the collar stand and would like to make the girls version next for the tiny humans. I used kam snaps instead of buttons this time so the kids can dress themselves on hectic mornings with little fussing. If I remember correctly the fabric I used in the photo is a Michael Miller cotton. 

I love the weight of the fabric used for this line and there are many great designs.

McCall M7458

I purchased this flannel sheep material with no set plan in mind, I just loved it so! I’m a sucker for cute animal prints. Turns out it didn’t sit other stash for long!  This shirt  was a really easy sew up and I loved the end result but I just can’t get a hang of kids sizing. Some patterns size by weight, others by body  measurements, and just to give you another option, some use common sizing you can find in stores. I am always worried these garments are never going to fit the kiddos! In the end it did fit! Yay!

I think that is just about everything I was sewing item wise this year. I do have a scrapbooking project that is taking me forever to complete, hopefully I can share that soon. Do you have any go to sewing patterns for gifts? How about other good seasonal gift crafts you would recommend?

January #sewmystyle : The Sunny DressĀ 


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The Sunny Dress pattern by the Friday Pattern company was the first sew for this year. It is a super simple knit dress with a scalloped hem  that I thought could be a nice addition to my wardrobe.

 Knits are not something that I stash to often so I didn’t have a huge selection to choose from without some shopping. Plus I wanted to make sure the fabric lended itself to my color selection for my capsule wardrobe plans. While I contemplated my fabric options a lot of people finished their Sunny Dresses and weighed in on the pattern. Based on other reviews, I expected some fit issues. I also wasn’t sure if the rayon jersey I had left over from a #makenine2017 would work on this pattern. After seeing other Sunnies in it, I decided that I would make a wearable muslin out of it to test the fit. 

I put together the pdf and traced out the medium top version. I also double checked the arm measurements of the pattern against my own. I have some arms on me and while others were sizing the pattern down, I was worried I was going to need to size up. However they proved to be perfect. In getting ready to cut out the fabric, I cut the pieces out flat instead of on the fold as the rayon jersey wants to move around a lot. I also cut a neck band that was 2″ x 2 6″ that worked perfectly with this fabric.

 I read the directions but decided to install the sleeves on the flat instead of on the round. I overlocked the garment together but twin needled the hem. I have a few different sizes in twin needle and I am still working out the optimum combo of fabric, stitch length, and size twin needle to avoid tunneling. For the top I selected the largest twin needle I have as I found the thinner fabrics and smaller twin needles give me some grief to completely ruining my almost finished garment. 

I increased my stitch length to 3 and have only the minorest of tunneling on my finished top.

I have the Baby Lock Grace and it has a twin needle setting, but even with this setting I haven’t been able to get rid of the tunneling 100%. I have looked at tutorials on how to correct this and I have yet to make it perfect. As a side note, this machine can not handle a loose bobin. Bad things happen and the angry thread monster appears to eat your garment. (All my twin needle woes just make me want a coverstitch machine more and more)

Any suggestions how I can improve my hem finish? 

(This is a Nicole Miller rayon jersey I purchased from Joann Fabrics by the way.)

Now on to the dress. Because the pattern comes in nicely in the waist I thought in dress form the medium would be to tight on my hips and show off my problem areas. So I graded out the pattern from the waist to the large. The pattern unfortunately does not have any waist marking lines, points to lengthen or shorten, or triangles to help you line up the pieces correctly. To make sure I was grading out the right spot, I took the pattern and pinned it to myself to mark my waist line and the fullest parts of my hips. This worked out fairly well and I like the finished fit. I made the dress out of double brushed poly I purchased from Knitpop. I cut the same size neck band out for the dress like I did for the top but it didn’t work out so well. I marked the neck band and attached it to the dress while it was on my dressform. I think this distorted the dress neck a little and the neck band needs redone. I think I am also going to shorten it an inch. This fabric did not like the twin needle for hemming so I went back to a single needle using a stretch stitch. I also used some Eloflex thread I have been experimenting with. Have you seen it yet?

The curved hem and this fabric didn’t lend itself to a smooth finished hem. My hem didn’t offend me to the point of removing it and starting over but I have room for improvement.

This is a super comfortable make and fairly easy to make. With a little more details on the pattern I think anyone could make it. Oh, and it annoyed me immensely that the yardage and notion requirements were not included in the pdf instructions. It is only on the website in the photos sections of the shop so I downloaded it for future reference. (See below)

There are some really gorgeous Sunny Dresses being shared recently and I loved seeing the hacks people came up with. One hack I wouldn’t mind trying is making it just a skirt. This hack would be great to use up some knit fabric if I *cough* accidentally over buy as it wouldn’t take more than a yard of fabric. I was also considering color blocking the pattern but couldn’t finalize a plan for it. If you are following adjustable this year, have you seen any great Sunny pattern hacks?



I’m ready for #sewmystyle2018!


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As if the #makenine challenge wasn’t enough personal sewing for me, I  am also participating in #sewmystyle this year! I am really excited in trying out more indie patterns, using new materials and learning different techniques.

I stalked some sewists last year and was really jealous of their makes and simultaneously bummed I missed out on the challenge. Let me tell you how excited I am that the challenge is happening again this year! Some of the patterns from last year are on my sewing wish list and I may swap them in for a few of this year’s selections that I may not participate in. 

Here is the list of makes for this year:

I like that some of the selected patterns have a few views you can make plus pattern hacks are acceptable. I am going to try really hard to sew from my stash, but no promises.

The pattern list selections will be updated as we go, but as of mid-January I am most looking forward to the below selections.

From left to right: January -Sunny Dress, August -Halifax hoodie, March – Kalle shirt dress, September – Fringe dress, December -Axel skirt.

I plan on participating in November with the lingerie pattern, but the selection hasn’t been relased yet. I am on the fence about making the Suki kimono because I am not convinced I need another kimono top in my wardrobe. I will cave if I find a fabric I can’t live without.

The Rumana coat is such a gorgeous pattern, but I will be skipping it because I just don’t need a new coat. It is a firm no on the Marigold jumpsuit because the pants are going to accentuate the heaviest part of my body, my hips. I am also going to pass on the Lander shorts/pants as well as the totes at this point in time.

Two patterns from last year’s list that I am going to swap with some of my no’s are the Sew house 7 Toaster sweater 

and the Cali Faye Collection Valley Blouse. 

I would love to add in a different indie pattern pant to my makes. Does anyone have a pattern they love for heavy hipped/Apple bottom girls?

Since January has already come to an end, I did make the Sunny top and dress. It may be a little late but I will review the pattern and share my completed garments here shortly. 


My #makenine2018 selections!


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I had a excruciatingly hard time deciding on what to do for my make nine selections.I wanted to make realistic selections and fill in holes in my wardrobe. Compounding my indicision,was the fact that I had a few projects that I started last year and did not finish. I pondered if I should use those for this year’s challenge or start fresh. My unfinished projects won’t go with my current color selections for my capsule wardrobe plans (see last post), but giving up on them would be wasteful in materials, time, and money. After much internal strife I have decided the unfinished projects must be finished with the materials I have and any open slots can go towards new makes that fit into my capsule wardrobe. 

So here are my unfinished projects and new selections for 2018!

#makenine2018 selections

Reappearing on my grid is:

 Simplicity’s 1018 : I traced out this pattern for the top right dress. I was hoping to make it fit on some yardage and scraps of a stretch crushed velour fabric I pulled from my stash. Unfortunately I can’t make all the pieces fit in what I have and I stupidly started cutting out of the scraps before verifying I had enough. So I need to come up with a plan of making this work out.

Simplicity’s 2219 : This pattern had also been traced and cut out of fabric I purchased for it. I am making the long sleeveless maxi that is on the bottom of the pattern envelope. I must say the fabric I choose is an odd selection for me. It always caught my eye on Joann’s and then it was on clearance so I went for it. Thus far I have applied interfacing to the necessary pieces and it is on my sewing table waiting for me.

Fabric for 2219

Fabric for 2219

Simplicity’s S0917 : I purchased fabric for this pattern without really consulting the suggestions on the back. So I made a slight error in assuming this pattern was for jersey fabrics for the dress as well. Wrong! The bralet calls for a stretch fabric only! I am still going to make this with the beautiful fabric I purchased but I may need to hack it some to make the jersey fabric work for it. I think I am going to do the straps and neck line in fold over elastic as well as add some strap details to the back. Fingers crossed it works out well for me!

Rayon spandex for S0917 -not what the instructions recommended

Rayon spandex for S0917 -not what the instructions recommended

Butterick’s B5889 : This pattern got dropped off my list last year because I was sick of sewing flimsy fabrics. I already have fabric for the top and it should fit into my color selections for my capsule wardrobe this year. I plan on making the top on the actual model.

Simplicity’s 1619  :  Even though I made the skirt last year from this pattern I want to make the top and the pants included in this pattern as well. Pants are sorely needed in my wardrobe. In particular pants that fit my rump. I have to do massive fit adjustments on pants and this pattern looks forgiving on someone who is still working out the adjustments on properly fitting pants.

Butterick’s B5748 : Ah my old foe, we shall meet again! Perhaps previously you have read about my strife with this pattern. To keep it brief, the bodice does not fit me anywhere! I will be completing massive adjustments to the pattern and finishing this beast I swear!

New to the grid are:

Butterick’s B6169 : This jacket gives me life! I am so excited to try it! I am not certain about the dress as I don’t have an event planned for its use but we shall see.

Buttericks’s B6183 : I want to try another pants pattern and these look comfortable. Again, I am sure I will be adjusting the pattern to correctly fit my seat. The top looks simple, clean and easy and a potentially nice wardrobe addition so I thought I would try it. I even picked up some fabric off the clearance rack for it that falls into my capsule wardrobe color scheme. 

Fabric selection for B6183

Fabric selection for B6183

I had my sister in tow at the time and she was not impressed with my selection. What do you think about adults wearing butterflys? 

Have you made any of these patterns before? Do you have any tips on getting dress bodices or pants fit correct? Share below please! 


What will I be sewing this year? Focusing, organizing, and a capsule wardrobe.


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Happy New Year! With this new year old man winter has brought my neck of the woods bitter cold temperatures, snow, and ice. Needless to say I am hibernating. I haven’t been spending to much time in my craft and sewing space because it’s the coldest part of the house but I have been planning my personal sewing this year all bundled up from my couch. In looking back at last year’s sewing,  I made some observations from my sewing habits from the #makenine2017 challenge. Basically I am a mag pie. Bright and shiny things get my attention ie if you frustrate me you are getting shelved. I work on things without a true plan and pick fabrics that appeal to me but may not have any coordinates already in my wardrobe. 

My style (or lack there of) is also unfocused and all over the place. In becoming an “adult” it seems that work dress code and ready to wear work friendly clothes kills my ability to further explore my personal style.  The thermostat at work being under lock and key has also dictated what I wear. It is never comfortably warm in the winter so I have to layer and rarely take my winter jacket off during the day. I would call my winter style “park bird lady frumpy”. Summer time it is rarely cool in the building, and clothing material matters. Rayon and silk tops are out as they make me warmer. My summer staples have become light weight t-shirts and tank tops with capri pants or light weight cargo pants. Sandals are frowned upon which has rekindled my love of chucks. We will call this look “reliving my undergrad years”.  Thankfully, I did a big overhaul to my work life last year and I am no longer with the companies I worked for. This has created a state of flux in my life and a state of exploration which although stressful, is also exciting. So I am no longer locked into a work uniform.

My current size is also an issue with me. My routine changed with a major work accident that took years to heal from and I started to literally wear my unhappiness with my injury and work on my body. I don’t know how to dress myself anymore aside from selecting everything oversized and I feel like I do have some body image issues that are going on in my head. I have been unsuccessful at rekindling my old routine back into my life and I have been struggling to find a new one that works for me. Which is a first for me. Anyone have any suggestions at creating lifestyle habits start and stick for me?

Due to all off the above, I have decided that I am going to create a capsule wardrobe this year and also do a major closet clean out. I am working my way through Colette’s Wardrobe Architect. She really helps you to start thinking about your wardrobe and what works for you. I am going to participate in #makenine2018 and #sewmystyle2018 sewing challenges to fill in the gaps in my wardrobe. And the first step I took to point me in a direction as the sewing challenges start is pick a color palette.

I took a hard look at my closet and looked for a color trend. Aside from black, there definitely was a trend. Comparing the colors to my natural hair and skin tones I made some eliminations and selected this color scheme for my capsule wardrobe.

Capsule wardrobe color selections

The color that concerns me a little and is pushing me out of the norm for me is the mustard. I don’t gravitate to it naturally, but it could be a nice compliment in some prints. Burgundy and purples are good colors for me as I am fair and have green eyes. I like the muted tones in these swatches and will be a good start for spring and summer sewing.

What do you think of my selections? Any suggestions for me?

Stay tuned for sewing selections, fabric hauls, and closet over hauls.


How did I do on the #makenine2017 project?


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How did I do on the #makenine2017 project? Not too shabby I have to say. I made more than nine things for myself this year! However two items were work related so I am not sure they count towards this challenge. My plan definitely evolved through out the year, but let’s start at the beginning shall we?

Original plan:

#makenine2017 selections

#makeine2017 selections

My plan was a little heavy with six dresses. I don’t wear dresses on a regular basis so I omitted two dresses within a month of starting the project.I also had my fill of sheer fabrics early in the year so I also decided against the cold shoulder top.

I started all three dresses on the top row but had limited success in finishing them. The retro butterick pattern gave me huge fit problems in the bodice. It basically needs re-drafted to fit my shoulders, waist and to have the darts in the right locations for me. I have the skirt completed along with a lining for it since I made it out of a vintage light colored linen. I hit the web to look for some help on this pattern and then seriously got frustrated as it seems I am the oddball who doesn’t fit this pattern out of the package. There are so many beautiful versions out there and I am struggling to complete mine because of fit issues! 

The second pattern gave me some new techniques to work on, French seams on shear flimsy fabrics. I pulled some fabrics out of the stash for the two dresses I cut out for the short version of this dress. I am at the last few steps to complete the first dress but stalled out at making bias tape out of the sheer overlay fabric. This seems like a huge headache of a task that I have not summoned the will power to complete. 

The third dress in the top row is cut out and ready to be put together. I was hoping to work on it over Christmas but I did not find the time.

All three patterns of the second row where removed from the plan.

I made the skirt from the first pattern of the third row. It came together nicely and I can wear it to work. I am not sure I used the best fabric for it but I liked the colors in it. Yes, I know, I need to work on taking photos actually wearing the garments.

I cut out the second pattern on the bottom row out of crushed velvet I had in the stash. Unfortunately I couldn’t make the pattern pieces all fit in the abundance of scrap pieces I had along with the yardage. The flair of the skirt makes the pieces wide and almost trumpet like. I purchased this fabric awhile ago and while it can still be found on Joann’s shelves it is definitely not the same color and texture. So I am still pondering how to make this work. 

The last pattern on the third row didn’t get started but I did purchase fabric for it from

It kinda looks like I botched this challenge right? But here are the things I did make this year.

Mccall’s legging pattern. I feel like I should do a full review of this pattern as it is not so straight forward as it seems. A spandex fabric is crucial to making this pattern fit correctly. I made the basic leggings in an R2-D2 jersey to go along with my lularoe knock off top.

Burda 6735

Burda 6735 

I found this beautiful striped linen that has some sparkly threads in it on the clearance rack that I had to have. I bought everything that was left on the bolt but I really wanted to make something out of it instead of it going into the stash. I picked the burda style 6735 and I thought I had enough fabric to squeak out version b. I lengthened the legs a little bit so they are closer to the knee. In doing this I didn’t have enough fabric to keep the pockets running in the same direction as the shorts so the pattern runs up and down on one side of the pockets and the other side runs left to right. You can’t see the pockets unless you try really hard so I don’t mind this very much. Plus I used up almost every inch of fabric.

Finished burda 6735

Finished burda 6735

Self drafted raglan tops

I hemmed a lularoe top for a friend. I never much considered the raglan top before and I did not have any in my wardrobe. But the shirt looked insanely comfortable. So I drafted a pattern and started whipping up a few. I will be shortening the body of the shirt a few inches for future makes but I am pretty happy with how they turned out.

On my second top I also made a matching head band. These tops also created a learning curve on using two different weights of knits on the same garment and some things to considering when planning other knit projects.

Colette Sorbetto

I have been eyeing some of the Colette patterns for awhile now, and I was really excited to hear that they offered the Sorbetto top pattern for free. The pdf pattern came together nicely and the instructions were easy to follow and complete.  I made the tank version but I may need to make a sleeved version as well.I used a Michael Miller fabric from the koi collection.

New Look 6512 – Version D

This pattern had a lot of pieces to it. Because of that it didn’t sew up quickly for me. It spent a bit of time in pieces until I could pick it back up. But overall I am happy with the finished top. I just wish I had a Disney trip planned to wear it to.

So sew easy – Racer back tank

Over at So sew easy they did an active wear summer series. She has some really great projects and she shared her patterns for free! So I tried out the racer back tank this summer. I wasn’t sure what the fit would be like on me so I made a size small in the watercolor print and a medium in the festive patriotic print. Both sizes fit me a little strangely in the shoulders so I may need to adjust the pattern if I make anymore. I wore these tops pretty much right after they were done. They were hanging up until I took these photos and the hem line has become distorted. So the patriotic print in particular needs re-hemmed. Does anyone have a list of fabrics that should hang for a bit before hemming so I avoid this problem again?

Scrub Tops

I don’t know if these should count for my make nine, but I am going to include them anyways. I use a modified pattern off of a commercially bought pattern. It was one of the first patterns I purchased and I failed to realize it was a plus sized pattern. So using a store bought scrub top and this pattern I resized the pattern to right amount of baggie I like in my scrubs. 

That’s it! I am  pleased with my personal sewing this year. I got a lot more done than I thought I could. This challenge also made me aware of my wardrobe and assessing my wardrobe is key to making things I will wear and not just multitudes of pretty dress I may only wear once. 

Who is taking part in make nine next year?


Children’s clothing: Vintage Simplicity 6419 review


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I wanted to sew up another from stash project that I could practice some skills with. But I didn’t want it to be a huge time killer. So I went digging through my pattern stash and selected Simplicity’s 6419. It’s a one size pattern and I have it in a girls size 6. Since it is a uncut pattern I began by tracing off the pieces for top 2. I also selected this blue loose paisley vintage cotton from the stash.

If I remember correctly there are 7 pieces to this top.Which is a few more than I was hoping for with my limited time frame but the directions were easy to follow and the basic construction came together quickly.
Vintage patterns overall do not consider finishing fabric edges. Given this is a kids top and probably will be washed a lot, I thought it best to stray from the directions and add some finishing steps of my own.

After reading the directions, I decided I would serge any exposed edges, like at the facings and sleeve edges. I tried out bias binding seam edges where the front pieces came together and at the sleeves. The side seams where the front and back meet and at shoulders are French seams. The bottom of the shirt is finished with 1 inch bias tape stitched to the bottom and pressed up over the raw edge. The bias tape was then attached to the body of the shirt with a machine blind hem stitch. The blind hem stitch wasn’t so invisible on the top despite the thread being pretty spot on as a color match. I think the fabric grab was just to big and the thread was thicker than the fiber content of the fabric. Could I have taken it out and done it by hand? Yes. But I think the machine stitching would be stronger than hand stitching for a kids top. 

Did you notice I overlapped the front panels the wrong way? There is a reason for that. I need a new iron. It doesn’t control its heart setting consistently anymore. Even on the lowest setting it could decide to heat up to the highest setting. This is what happened when I was pressing the facings back.

The fabric got a little scorched mark on it! The easiest solution was to just make this the button side. 

Who decided that girls shirts would be overlapped one way and boys shirts the other? What was so wrong with them just all being one way? Anyone out there have an explanation for this?

Anyways my other oops moment on this top was the vey last button hole spacing. It’s a little too high. Of course you don’t notice this until after your button hole is sewn in! I did some great seam finishings that no one will  see just to screw up the front! But that is why this was a practice project from the stash. 

I sent this off to a little friend of mine and she didn’t notice anything šŸ˜‰


Vintage Simplicity 5251


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From time to time I am given stashes of sewing materials from friends and family. Not to long ago I was given a large box of fabric and some vintage patterns. Mixed in the box of fabric was this pattern, all cut out, waiting for someone to sew it up.

It’s a single size pattern and view 1 was cut out in a similar blue fabric to the pattern envelope. I decided I was going to sew it for some practice using every applicable stitch I could use on my sewing machine. 

After reading the directions, I noticed that finishing the seams was not noted anywhere. Instead of doing French seams, I decided to serge all the pieces. I should have serged pieces as I constructed, because serging everything did add some bulk to areas like the collar and at the facings. But that’s why we practice.

The stitches:

A.   I used this decorative vine stitch on the sleeves, pockets, and down the fronts. It worked great on the sleeves which were only two layers.

Detail of finished cuffed sleeve.

It did not work out so well on the fronts which were two layers with interfacing. It seemed that my machine got a little bogged down in those pieces and the leaves are not evenly spaced.

B. Bar tack (pictured above) is the vertical row of stitches at the pocket edge to help prevent your pockets from ripping or coming loose from the main garment. This is the first time I used this stitch and it will be useful in constructing things like scrub tops. I didn’t get the starting point quite right as the stitches start a little higher than the edge of the pocket. Practice, practice,practice!

C. Blind hem stitch. To finish the hem, instead of whip stitching by hand, I used the blind hem stitch. I have used this stitch before and I have found some applications are better than others. Using this stitch on this garment worked well. The thread I used was pretty close in color and the hem was straight. You can hardly see it from a distance.

D. Automatic button hole stitch. After the initial set up of the special presser foot, this stitch makes bottom holes a breeze. But I measured my hole placement a little too far into the garment. The final step and I mess it up! Thankfully this is just practice. The button holes would have looked a lot better moved to the right. I found the flower buttons that match the fabric perfectly at my local Joann Fabrics. Due to their recessed holes I sewed the buttons on by hand instead of using the button attachment feature my baby lock has.

So now I have a finished house coat that I have no clue what to do with.

Overall this pattern was really easy to put together and to complete. I am not sure if I will have a need to sew another house coat, but maybe they will come back in vogue like everything else seems too.



Sewing the Peek-a-Boo Pouch : A Review


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In my recent wanderings of the internet reading sewing blogs and scrolling through pinterest I found Sewcanshe’s tutorial and free pattern for the Peek-a-Boo Pouch. I was instantly interested in making one. My sewing supplies desperately needed something to organize and carry them. At the moment when my supplies need to leave the house I embarrassingly carry them in a recycled plastic container that once carried jelly boob inserts for a previous sewing commission. Really professional right?

So I printed out the provided pattern (you can find it here with directions–> Peek-a-Boo pouch) and dug through my fabric containers looking for something in my stash to make me something more professional to carry my sewing supplies. I purchased a remnant of a skull print a bit ago that I couldn’t pass up and I had no plans for. It was suggested to re-purpose the plastic bags that curtains or sheets come in. I didn’t have any of those laying around, but I did have clear vinyl that I covered dining room chairs in. I pulled a zipper out of the stash, some interfacing, and grabbed my container of snaps.

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